Engendering African American Archaeology

A Southern Perspective

  • Author(s): Galle, Jillian E., and Amy L. Young, eds.
  • Series:
  • Imprint: Univ Tennessee Press
  • Publication Date: 2004-10-14
  • Status: Active
  • Available in Hardcover - Cloth: Price $35.00 | Buy Now
  • Available in Hardcover - Printed Case: Price $0.00 | Buy Now
  • Available in Paper: Price $32.95 | Buy Now

“A welcome publication, this book will nicely supplement the other books that are now appearing in the field of African American archaeology.”—Charles E. Orser Jr., Illinois State University

Over the last decade, the field of American historical archaeology has seen enormous growth in the study of people of African descent. This edited volume is the first dedicated solely to archaeology and the construction of gender in an African American context. The common thread running through this collection is not a shared definition of gender or an agreed-upon feminist approach, but rather a regional thread, a commitment to understanding ethnicity and gender within the social, political, and ideological structures of the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century American South.

Taken together, these essays represent a departure in historical archaeology, an important foray into the study of the construction of gender within various African American communities that is based in the archaeological record. Those interested in historical archaeology, history, women’s studies and African American studies will find this a valuable addition to the literature. Topics range from gendered residential and consumption patterns in colonial Virginia and the construction of identity in Middle Tennessee to midwifery practices in postbellum Louisiana.

Contributors to this volume include Melanie Cabak, Marie Danforth, Garrett Fesler, Jillian Galle, Barbara Heath, Larry McKee, Patricia Samford, Elizabeth Scott, Brian Thomas, Larissa Thomas, Laura Wilkie, Kristin Wilson, and Amy Young.

Jillian E. Galle is project manager of the Digital Archaeological Archive of Chesapeake Slavery at Monticello. Amy L. Young is assistant professor at the University of Southern Mississippi.